Having Children Drastically Changed My Beauty Routine – These Are My Time-Saving Products

As an avid fan of skincare – and a mother of two – Style Me Sunday’s Natalie Lee has had to find a way to make her beauty routine fit into her busy life. Here, she shares her tips and tricks

natalie lees beauty routine with children

by Natalie Lee |

Everything changes after you have children, even if you are adamant it won’t, as I was. It might not be one of the things you expect to change or even plan for, but my beauty routine is certainly one of the major parts of my everyday life that has changed. Of course, there are different drivers to the changes – less time for yourself, or maybe your skin and hair has changed through pregnancy and giving birth. Often, for example, women experience some hair loss after having children, which can understandably be terrifying.

I have always enjoyed the whole process of a skincare routine – it feels good to know you’re looking after yourself. These days, I just have to be a bit quicker in the morning. I shower and apply my skincare, followed by make-up, in-between the numerous times I ask the kids to brush their teeth and while they’re occupied for a few moments eating their breakfast. It’s not quite the same relaxing routine it used to be. In terms of my skin, I have noticed that it’s become drier, so I try to make sure I use a heavier moisturiser morning and night. I have recently discovered the new Decléor green mandarin range for instantly glowing skin – I use the Essential Oil Glow Serum and the Sun-Kissed Glow Cream, both of which make you look live you've just been on holiday.

When I get the chance, a long soak in the bath is a totally luxury for me. I shut the door, put a candle on, add some bath oil and listen to Oprah’s Supersoul Conversations podcast while my husband looks after the kids. This is the time for those extras that feel like a treat, like Patchology’s Rejuvenating Eye Gels.

By far, the biggest change for me since having children has been developing alopecia. I had a very stressful year, in which my eldest daughter was diagnosed with a serious eye condition called Brittle Cornea Syndrome and was losing her eyesight as a result. So, when I first noticed that my hair was becoming thinner around my hairline, I wasn’t entirely surprised and assumed it was due to stress. I knew that the two are linked. And, apparently people of Afro-Caribbean descent have fewer hair shafts than Caucasian people, meaning they are more susceptible to develop conditions like alopecia.

After seeing dermatologists and trichologists, it seems that I have developed this due to the number of years I spent using strong chemicals to straighten my hair, as well as pulling my hair back into tight ponytails. Oddly enough, a couple of years before I noticed the alopecia, I had begun to embrace my natural hair. Before that, I had always chemically straightened it from a very young age and thought of my Afro hair as a problem. I had always been told it was incredibly thick and too difficult to manage in its natural state.

Since taking the plunge to go natural, I adore my hair and am proud to let my daughters see how much I am enjoying the natural beauty of my hair. Those chemical treatments and blow drying my hair really cost a lot of money and took so much time. I can’t believe how much money and time I have saved since embracing my ‘fro.

Nowadays, I try and get away with the bare minimum. Maximum results for minimum time and effort – that’s definitely my new ethos.

SHOP: Natalie's Favourite Time-Saving Beauty Buys

READ MORE: How to Care for Afro Hair: Everything I Learned About My Natural Hair During Lockdown

READ MORE: How To Deal With Postpartum Hair Loss After Having A Baby

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