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Romantic Confrontation Is Hard In The Real World, Let Alone The Love Island Villa

Hands up if you can recall a time when you successfully confronted someone for treating you badly? Can you pin point a scenario where you effectively explained how and why this individual hurt you, conveyed the appropriate level of anguish/anger/disdain without being too rash, and all the while managed to neither cry nor let anyone else cotton on to just how awkward and uncomfortable confrontation is for you, too? No? Me neither.

We all know how rubbish confrontation is and I'm inclined to suggest that most of us will shy away from it where possible, especially when it concerns all the complicated emotions in romantic relationships. But we've sort of forgotten this thanks to the crafty reality TV production teams who orchestrate 'chance' meetings between ex-lovers on the otherwise vacant river banks of Chelsea.

So when Love Island's Rosie Williams gathered the other contestants, marched over to Adam Collard and aired her grievances over how he had treated her, our spines shivered in both fear and solidarity at what she was about to attempt - disgracing a cocksure playboy and nudging him off his high horse.

Adam, for those who haven't been keeping up, had initially chosen to couple with Kendall, thus taking her from her original partner Niall. As the days went by, they seemed to like each other. However the physical affection between the two wasn't building as quickly as he wanted. Adam then decided that Kendall was taking it 'too slow' and was too insecure for his liking so instead made moves towards new girl Rosie before selecting her at the recoupling ceremony - making them official (in the Love Island bed-sharing sense of the word) and having Kendall evicted from the villa.

After a few days of coupledom between Adam and Rosie, the Adam Pattern re-emerges. A new girl enters the house, he lays the ground work to distance himself from current partner Rosie and claims to the other housemates (but fails to tell Rosie herself) that it's because she likes him more than her, they're not a 'real' couple and she's too materialistic. He then makes a beeline for new girl, Meghan, who then relays the not very nice things Adam has said back to Rosie.

Rosie is understandably hurt, she was very much into the guy, but she chose to confront Adam about his sly and shady behaviour. 'I'm doing it for every girl that's been played by a playboy and has been feeling the way I feel today', Rosie tells Georgia before making her way over to Adam, calling over the other Islanders dotted around the garden to join her.

She's clearly nervous - why wouldn't she be? Rosie was about to try and pull off the public take down that many a scorned woman has at one point wished she was brave enough, quick enough, willing enough, to do. And while her execution was far from perfect (and who can blame her) Rosie earned the respect of viewers up and down the country for one of the realest 'reality' confrontation we've seen on TV in a while.

It wasn't a Sex and the City-style cosmopolitan flung in the unsuspecting face of one of Samantha's unworthy conquests. It wasn't a teary eyed shouting match a-la the cast of Made In Chelsea and thankfully it was nothing like the frustratingly awkward and unproductive exchange when Eyal tried to call Hayley out on her behaviour the night before. It was a sassy, albeit performative, face off in front of an audience of emotionally invested peers.

Rosie didn't back down when Adam, true to the character of 'powerful man under unanticipated threat', teetered on the edge of gaslighting her. She made it known that she wasn't happy, he'd done wrong and it wasn't good enough. And while I'm sure some of you - like me - wished she'd been able to say so much more, that his ignorance towards women isn't currency for exchange between the other male contestants who, funnily enough, aren't the same way inclined, I also couldn't imagine stepping up to the plate with such confidence in the first place.

I salut you, Rosie, for having the courage and self-respect to stand up to a guy you fancied. For refusing to take BS from a man who believed that bad mouthing the woman he's happy to kiss and cuddle in bed (but not out in broad daylight in the presence of other potential prey) wouldn't come back and bite him in the ass. Well done. It wasn't perfectly scripted, with a cinematic payoff, but it was certainly relatable. And the lump in my throat that forms every time I imagine being in Rosie's head through that conversation is real as hell.

MORE: Who Are The Contestants Left In The Love Island Villa? Here's A Brief Introduction

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