Still Lives By Maria Hummel And Four Other Books So Good Reese Witherspoon Is Already On Their Case

A sure sign your latest book is going to be totally unputdownable? When Reese Witherspoon already has her eye on it...

Still Lives Maria Hummel review

by Alexandra Heminsley |

A sure sign your latest book is going to be totally unputdownable? When Reese Witherspoon has already earmarked it for her Hello Sunshine book club or even screen adaptation...

How do you know that a book is going to be immensely readable? Because Reese Witherspoon has already gotten involved. No-one can spot a blockbuster ripe for adaptation quite like Reese. And with Still Lives by Maria Hummel already on her radar at the Hello Sunshine book club, here are four more books which have already been given the Witherspoon Seal Of Approval

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Grazia books - 20 November

STILL LIVES - Maria Hummel (Quercus)
1 of 5

Kim Lord is an avant garde artist, about to launch her new, controversial show focused on the victims of famous killers .. when she goes missing. The plot is that of a thriller, but with its highly specific Los Angeles art-world setting, and the introspective, analytical nature of our narrator and heroine, it reads like something a little more sophisticated. An intriguing read, and, if adapted, we'd like to see Michelle Williams in the lead. Other books Reece Witherspoon has picked for the screen which we need to read firstu2026

Luckiest Girl Alive - Jessica Knoll (Pan)
2 of 5

Ani FaNelli seems to have created the perfect life for herself, with the wardrobe to match. A glossy magazine editor with a suitably glossy and devoted fiancé , she is so confident that she has life nailed that she invites a documentary crew to interview her about her past trauma, even filming her wedding. The trouble is, she's keeping a handful of secrets, has suffered more that one trauma, and suddenly things start unravelling as the wedding date looms. An unexpected, twisty read, with the sort of broken-but-indomitable heroine which will have actresses queuing round the block to play.

Second Life - SJ Watson (Black Swan)
3 of 5

Julia Plummer seems successful and well to do, but when her sister is murdered, it throws up not just feelings from her less salubrious past but the opportunity for Julia to start digging around online, trying to solve the mystery herself. Soon she is falling headlong into a world of online relationships and experiencing the sort of heady addiction that could prove disastrous for an alcoholic like herself. Watson is brilliant on how intoxicating online life can be, and it will be intriguing to see how that translates to the screen.

The Thing about Jellyfish - Ali Benjamin (Macmillan)
4 of 5

A young adult novel that will work for pretty much all of us on screen, this is a story about grief, inspiration and self-discovery. Suzy's best friend dies but she becomes obsessed by the idea that as Franny was a strong swimmer she must instead have been stung by a killer jellyfish. Her path through grief will be to find out as much as she possibly can about jellyfish. This is a lyrical piece of storytelling perfectly capturing the way certain bookish school girls can live in their own head when real life becomes too overwhelming.

Opening Belle - Maureen Sherry (Simon & Schuster UK)
5 of 5

The title is a reference to the New York Stock Exchange and this is a very NYC novel - a sort of US Alison Pearson, it sees Isabelle caught in the classic female struggle: a great job, a great husband, a a great family, and a total loss as to how to make it all fit together. It's not a new story but there are great insights into Wall Street, and the locations and insider's New York make it a fun, snappy read. And of course if we get Witherspoon in the title role the film will be a joy.

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STILL LIVES - Maria Hummel (Quercus)
1 of 5

STILL LIVES - Maria Hummel (Quercus)

Kim Lord is an avant garde artist, about to launch her new, controversial show focused on the victims of famous killers .. when she goes missing. The plot is that of a thriller, but with its highly specific Los Angeles art-world setting, and the introspective, analytical nature of our narrator and heroine, it reads like something a little more sophisticated. An intriguing read, and, if adapted, we'd like to see Michelle Williams in the lead. Other books Reece Witherspoon has picked for the screen which we need to read firstu2026

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And when you're done, check out Jonathan Coe's Middle England, plus other political books that won't make you feel totally depressed about Brexit...

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