Zac Posen is Shutting Down His Fashion Label

After almost 20 years the New York designer is closing his namesake label

New York fashion designer Zac Posen is shuttering his label

by Grazia |

After nearly 20 years, Zac Posen is closing down. The news came rather abruptly and the label’s website has already shut down.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the owners of the brand, House of Z and Z Spoke, announced they would be shuttering the label, releasing a statement saying,

“The Board of Managers is disappointed with this outcome but can no longer continue operations and believe an orderly disposition at this stage is the best course of action.”

Since the label first launched in 2001, Zac Posen has dressed some of the world’s most famous and glamorous women from Michelle Obama to Princess Eugenie, for whom he created the wedding reception gown. He gained recognition as a designer not long after graduating from Central Saint Martins in London, and before long he was dressing Hollywood’s biggest names and winning awards.

The 39-year-old New Yorker became even more of a household name when he became a judge of Project Runway in 2012. And in 2014, he was named Creative Director at Brooks Brothers, where he helped to modernize their womenswear.

Posen’s flattering clothes also appeared on the big and small screens in shows like Ugly Betty (on which he had a guest appearance) and films like Ocean’s Eight – he is responsible for Rihanna’s incredible red Met Gala gown.

Posen released a statement thanking his team for their work and support over the last 18 years. He also said, “The management team at the Company worked extremely hard to navigate the increasingly challenging fashion and retail landscape, consistently evaluating strategic options to strengthen our financial profile and fuel potential growth.”

The news of Posen’s label shuttering came as it was announced that the iconic department store Barneys, which was only four years shy of a 100-year anniversary, would sold off, evidence of the “challenging fashion and retail landscape” Posen refers to.

In an interview with Vogue, Posen shared that he needs to “reflect and regroup and also look at the world we’re living in and figure what the next move is, where I can share my creativity and my love, and build another community.” Whatever is next for Posen, he feels “incredibly proud of what we created and hopeful for the future.

Read More: Royal Wedding Dresses Throughout History

Gallery

Royal wedding dresses through history - Grazia

Royal wedding dresses
1 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Queen Victoria is one of just two British Queens to have married while reigning (the other is Queen Mary). For her wedding to Prince Albert at St James' Palace, the young Queen chose a simple off-the-shoulder style in white satin, with a flounce of Honiton lace at the neckline. Instead of a coronet, she wore a simple orange blossom garland.

Royal wedding dresses
2 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Princess Victoria, daughter of Queen Victoria, wed Prince Frederick William of Prussia, in January 1858 wearing a rich white moire antique decorated with three flounces of Honiton lace designed to resemble bouquets of rose, shamrock and thistle in three medallions. Each flounce of the dress had a wreath of orange and myrtle blossoms, which were the bridal flower of Germany.

Royal wedding dresses
3 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

For her wedding to Prince Henry of Battenberg in 1885, Princess Beatrice, the youngest daughter of Queen Victoria, wore a fashionable white satin dress, trimmed with lace (which the Princess is said to have loved) and orange blossom. She was the only of Victoria's daughters to wear her mother's veil down the aisle, too.

Royal wedding dresses
4 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

The future Queen Mary's wedding dress was designed by Arthur Silver of the Silver Studio, whose designs epitomised the Art Nouveau look. Her classic gown was embroidered with roses, shamrocks and thistles, with the choice of orange blossom for the trim echoed in small wreaths adorning her neckline and her hair. Her 'something old' was a small piece of Honiton lace from her mother's own wedding gown, with diamond jewellery from future mother-in-law Queen Victoria ticking off 'something borrowed.'

Royal wedding dresses
5 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

The future Queen Mother's wedding dress was quintessentially 1920s in style, with a simple drop waist. Designed by Madame Handley-Seymour, the dressmaker to Queen Mary, it was made of ivory silk crepe and embroidered with pearls. Her Flanders lace veil was held in place by a wreath of orange blossom and white roses, the latter a nod to the her future title of Duchess of York.

Royal wedding dresses
6 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Court couturier Norman Hartnell described the wedding gown of the then-Princess Elizabeth as 'the most beautiful dress I had so far made.' Patterned with stars and floral embellishments, the dress – and its 13 foot train – was said to be inspired by Botticelli's Primavera, and to symbolise the nation's rebirth following the war. As clothing rationing was still in place (even for a Princess), Elizabeth had to purchase the fabric with ration coupons (though she was inundated with coupons from young women across the country, she had to return them to their owners).

Royal wedding dresses
7 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

When Princess Margaret married photographer Anthony Armstrong-Jones, she opted for a design by royal couturier Norman Hartnell. Comprising 30 metres of silk organza, the dress's simple shape and clean lines were designed to flatter the Princess's petite frame.

Royal wedding dresses
8 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Ahead of her marriage to Captain Mark Phillips, Princess Anne seemed to take sartorial inspiration from times past, specifically the court of Queen Elizabeth I: her wedding gown, designed by Maureen Baker for Susan Small, featured a Tudor-style high neck and sweeping, almost medieval sleeves.

Royal wedding dresses
9 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Lady Diana Spencer's now-iconic 1981 wedding dress set bridal trends for years to come, with its puffed sleeves, 25-foot train and full skirt. Designed by David and Elizabeth Emanuel, the ivory silk taffeta gown was embellished with tiny sequins and pearls in a heart motif.

Royal wedding dresses
10 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Lindka Cierach designed this quintessentially '80s wedding dress for Sarah Ferguson's wedding to Prince Andrew. Made from ivory duchesse satin, it boasted a 17 foot long train embroidered with bees and thistles (a nod to her family's crest) and anchors and waves (symbolizing Prince Andrew's naval career). The York Diamond tiara which Fergie wore on the day was commissioned especially for her by her mother-in-law, the Queen.

Royal wedding dresses
11 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Samantha Shaw was tasked with designing and making a dress for the wedding of Sophie Rhys-Jones (now the Countess of Wessex) to the Queen's youngest son, Prince Edward. The long-sleeved style was embellished with 325,000 cut glass and pearl beads.

Royal wedding dresses
12 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Camilla's embroidered coat in pale blue and gold and matching chiffon gown were designed by Robinson Valentine for her wedding to the Prince of Wales at St George's Chapel, Windsor. Her statement headpiece – which featured Swarowski diamonds – was the handiwork of the royal family's favourite milliner, Philip Treacy.

Royal wedding dresses
13 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Canadian-born Autumn Kelly opted for a classic gown by British designer Sassi Holford, which featured a bodice fashioned from hand-beaded lace and a silk duchesse skirt, worn with a beaded shrug. The Festoon tiara which the bride wore on the day was borrowed from the collection of her mother-in-law, Princess Anne.

Royal wedding dresses
14 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Zara Phillips wore a simple, classic gown with a full skirt and corseted bodice by Stewart Parvin, one of her grandmother the Queen's favourite couturiers, when she married rugby player Mike Tindall at Canongate Kirk in Edinburgh. The diamond tiara was the bride's 'something borrowed,' a loan from her mother Princess Anne.

Royal wedding dresses
15 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Sarah Burton of Alexander McQueen landed the biggest fashion gig of the century so far when she was chosen by Kate Middleton to design a dress for her Westminster Abbey wedding to Prince William. The gown itself was made from ivory satin with long lace sleeves and floral motifs which were cut from machine-made lace then appliqued onto silk net by workers at the Royal School of Needlework.

Royal wedding dresses
16 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

We all know that Givenchy's Clare Waight Keller designed Meghan Markle's wedding dress, but there's a fun fact about the detailing. The flowers embroidered into the veil represent the 53 nations of the Commonwealth, a nod to Prince Harry's role as Youth Ambassador.

Royal wedding dresses
17 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Princess Eugenie had a very particular request when it came to her wedding dress, which designer Peter Pilotto accommodated. He designed her dress with a low-back as to reveal the scars from her scoliosis surgery.

Royal wedding dresses
18 of 18
CREDIT: Getty

Lady Gabriella Windsor walked down the aisle in a Luisa Beccaria gown, which as made "entirely in Valencienne écru lace layered with ribbons of flowers and buds" says the designer.

Just so you know, whilst we may receive a commission or other compensation from the links on this website, we never allow this to influence product selections - read why you should trust us