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Wes Anderson Exhibition In London Attracts 400,000 Visitors

© Isle of Dogs

Wes Anderson’s aesthetic is so influential, he’s inspired a cafe in Milan, an Instagram account @accidentallywesanderson and even interior design trends, so it is no surprise that an exhibition celebrating his latest film has proven to be a massive success in London.

17 breath-taking sets from his new stop-motion film, Isle of Dogs, are currently on show at The X Store at 180 The Strand, attracting 400,000 fans so far. The free exhibition has had up to 400 queuing at any one time, with today being the last day that people can see it. It has proven so popular that its run has already been extended – it was supposed to close last Thursday – with final entry figures looking to reach a whopping 500,000.

‘When I initially spoke to Wes’s team, they were excited by the idea of being able to give the film’s beautiful sets a second life as standalone artworks to enrich filmgoers’ experiences,’ said the X Store’s Tommy Tannock. ‘From each little miniature Japanese newspaper to the delicate swirls on the dogs’ fur, it’s been such a joy providing a platform to share the meticulous detail the set designers and puppeteers went to in order to deliver Wes Anderson’s vision of Japan.’

Filmed in East London Studios, the latest from Anderson follows the adventures of 12-year-old boy Atari Kobayashi, who is searching for his dog Spots after a new law banished canines to an island dubbed Trash Island. Spekaing recently on Adam Buxton’s podcast, Anderson revealed that seeing the DLR stop ‘Isle of Dogs’ inspired the film, imagining an entire storyline just based on the place name.

Known for his whimsical taste, Anderson’s previous films include The Royal Tenenbaums, Moonrise Kingdom and The Grand Budapest Hotel. Often working with the same roster of actors – Bill Murray, Jason Schwartzman and Luke Wilson have appeared in several of his films – he has become one of the most popular directors of the 21st century, lauded for his unique vision.